Women and the 1951 Refugee Convention: Fifty Years of Seeking Visibility

Authors

  • Nahla Valji

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.21227

Abstract

The refugee regime, built on the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees, has long excluded women from the international right to protection from persecution. The gender-blind parameters of the Convention have been exacerbated by the same qualities in the international legal system of which it is a part; state practices toward asylum-seekers; and the dichotomous construction of the refugee regime as a whole, which has produced and reproduced victimizing identities of refugee women. Advances today, such as the adoption of gender guidelines in a number of states, have been more symbolic in effect than transforming. New policy paths need to be evaluated to ensure that the next half-century of refugee protection does not duplicate the inequalities of the past.

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Published

2001-05-01

How to Cite

Valji, N. (2001). Women and the 1951 Refugee Convention: Fifty Years of Seeking Visibility. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 19(5), 25–35. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.21227