A Double Punishment: The Context of Postsecondary Access for Racialized Precarious Status Migrant Students in Toronto, Canada

  • Paloma E. Villegas University of Toronto, Scarborough
  • Tanya Aberman York University and FCJ Refugee Centre

Abstract

This article examines how the immigration and schooling systems in Canada intersect to deny access to migrant youth with precarious status throughout educational trajectories. While there are access policies at the primary and secondary school level, barriers increase in post-secondary education. We argue that such students transitioning to university experience a “double punishment” through racialized exclusion in the education and immigration systems. Our research draws from semi-structured interviews with migrant youth and our experience organizing an access program at York University that targets precarious status students for inclusion. We propose that Canadian universities and policymakers learn from such access programs to increase equitable inclusion at other institutions.

Author Biographies

Paloma E. Villegas, University of Toronto, Scarborough
Lecturer, Sociology
Tanya Aberman, York University and FCJ Refugee Centre
PhD candidate in Gender Feminist and Women's Studies, York University and Research and Project Coordinator at FCJ Refugee Centre
Published
2019-06-03
How to Cite
Villegas, P. E., & Aberman, T. (2019). A Double Punishment: The Context of Postsecondary Access for Racialized Precarious Status Migrant Students in Toronto, Canada. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 35(1), 72-82. Retrieved from https://refuge.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/refuge/article/view/40531