The Spaces In Between: American and Australian Interdiction Policies and Their Implications for the Refugee Protection Regime

Authors

  • Jessica C. Morris U.S. Refugee Resettlement Program

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.21308

Keywords:

United States, Australia, interdiction, asylum policy, refugee protection, law, non-refoulement

Abstract

Interdiction policies by countries such as the U.S. and Australia are embedded in these states’ perception of their obligations to asylum seekers as strictly territorially bound. With the aim of limiting asylum seekers access to protection mechanisms, these policies are carried out in an arena firmly within the reach of executive-driven actions yet beyond the purview of constitutional or judicial safeguards. In the case of the U.S., the long-standing Haitian interdiction policy illustrates the manipulation of this protection gap, and, in Australia, the administration’s reaction to the Tampa incident in 2001 and the subsequent policy developments provide further illustration. The autonomy with which states carry out such policies poses a significant threat to the refugee protection regime, especially the international norm of non-refoulement.

Published

2003-12-01

How to Cite

Morris, J. C. (2003). The Spaces In Between: American and Australian Interdiction Policies and Their Implications for the Refugee Protection Regime. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 21(4), 51–62. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.21308

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