What Role Does Type of Sponsorship Play in Early Integration Outcomes? Syrian Refugees Resettled in Six Canadian Cities

  • Michaela Hynie York University
  • Susan McGrath York University
  • Jonathan Bridekirk York University
  • Anna Oda York University
  • Nicole Ives Nicole Ives is an Associate Professor and Director of the Bachelor of Social Work program
  • Jennifer Hyndman York University
  • Neil Arya McMaster University
  • Yogendra B. Shakya Access Alliance Multicultural Health and Community Services
  • Jill Hanley McGill University
  • Kwame McKenzie Wellesley Institute

Abstract

Abstract
There is little longitudinal research that directly compares the effectiveness of Canada’s Government-Assisted Refugee (GAR) and Privately Sponsored Refugee (PSR) Programs that takes into account possible socio-demographic differences between them. This article reports findings from 1,921 newly arrived adult Syrian refugees in British Columbia, Ontario, and Quebec. GARs and PSRs differed widely on several demographic characteristics, including length of time displaced. Furthermore, PSRs sponsored by Groups of 5 resembled GARs more than other PSR sponsorship types on many of these characteristics. PSRs also had broader social networks than GARs. Sociodemographic differences and city of residence influenced integration outcomes, emphasizing the importance of considering differences between refugee groups when comparing the impact of these programs.

Author Biographies

Michaela Hynie, York University

Michaela Hynie is a professor in the Department of Psychology at York University. The author may be contacted at mhynie@yorku.ca.

Susan McGrath, York University

Susan McGrath is a professor emerita in the School of Social Work at York University. The author may be contacted at smcgrath@yorku.ca.

Jonathan Bridekirk, York University

Jonathan Bridekirk is a PhD student in the Department of Psychology at York University. The author may be contacted at jonathanbridekirk@gmail.com.

Anna Oda, York University

Anna Oda is the refugee integration and long-term health outcomes project coordinator at York University. The author may be contacted at annaoda@yorku.ca.

Nicole Ives, Nicole Ives is an Associate Professor and Director of the Bachelor of Social Work program

Nicole Ives is an associate professor and director of the Bachelor of Social Work Program at McGill University. The author may be contacted at nicole.ives@mcgill.ca.

Jennifer Hyndman, York University

Jennifer Hyndman is a professor and director of the Centre for Refugees Studies, York University. The author may be contacted at jhyndman@yorku.ca.

Neil Arya, McMaster University

Neil Arya is a family physician in Kitchener, ON, and assistant clinical professor in family medicine at McMaster University. The author may be contacted at narya@uwaterloo.ca.

Yogendra B. Shakya, Access Alliance Multicultural Health and Community Services

Yogendra B. Shakya is a senior research scientist at Access Alliance. The author may be contacted at yshakya@accessalliance.ca.

Jill Hanley, McGill University

Jill Hanley is an associate professor in the School of Social Work at McGill University. The author may be contacted at jill.hanley@mcgill.ca.

Kwame McKenzie, Wellesley Institute

Kwame McKenzie is the CEO of the Wellesley Institute. The author may be contacted at kwame@wellesleyinstitute.com.

Published
2019-06-05
How to Cite
Hynie, M., McGrath, S., Bridekirk, J., Oda, A., Ives, N., Hyndman, J., Arya, N., Shakya, Y. B., Hanley, J., & McKenzie, K. (2019). What Role Does Type of Sponsorship Play in Early Integration Outcomes? Syrian Refugees Resettled in Six Canadian Cities. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 35(2), 36-52. https://doi.org/10.7202/1064818ar