The Cautious Politics of “Humanizing” Refugee Research

Authors

  • Jonathan Darling Department of Geography, Durham University, UK

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40798

Keywords:

humanization, refugee studies, refugee mobility, race

Abstract

In this intervention, I reflect on what it may mean to ‘humanize’ refugee research. The assumption often made is that ‘humanizing’ can arise through a concern with the particularity of the individual, through drawing from ‘the mass’ the narrative of the singular and employing this as a means to identify, , and potentially understand others. Yet such a move risks a reliance on creating relations of empathy and compassion that elide political responses to dehumanization and often relies on a assumption of what constitutes the category of “the human,” an assumption that has been critically challenged by post-colonial writing.

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Published

2021-11-22

How to Cite

Darling, J. (2021). The Cautious Politics of “Humanizing” Refugee Research. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 37(2), 56–62. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40798