Living with Precarious Legal Status in Canada: Implications for the Well-Being of Children and Families

Authors

  • Judith K. Bernhard Ryerson University
  • Luin Goldring York University
  • Julie Young York University
  • Carolina Berinstein Access Alliance Multicultural Community Health Centre
  • Beth Wilson Community Social Planning Council of Toronto

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.21388

Keywords:

Canada, legal status, precarious status, citizenship, family, children, integration, well-being

Abstract

This study focused on the effects of precarious status on the well-being of fifteen participants with particular attention to their attempts to claim services, their feelings of belonging and sense of social support, and the effects of parents’ status on children. It investigates ways in which the status of one family member can affect the well-being of the entire family. Those who had children reported that the family’s status disadvantaged their children, whether they were Canadian or foreign-born, as parents’ status was used to justify denying children rights to which they are entitled by international, national, and provincial laws. The paper challenges approaches to citizenship and immigration status that fail to consider the implications of legal status for a person’s primary social units and networks.

Published

2007-06-01

How to Cite

Bernhard, J. K., Goldring, L., Young, J., Berinstein, C., & Wilson, B. (2007). Living with Precarious Legal Status in Canada: Implications for the Well-Being of Children and Families. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 24(2), 101–114. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.21388

Issue

Section

Feature Articles

Similar Articles

1 2 > >> 

You may also start an advanced similarity search for this article.